Immigration fraud by changed activities on a B-2 visa – the 30/60-day rule

When the stated purpose for which a person applies for a non-immigrant US visa or seeks admission at a port of entry is different from his activities within a given time an immigration officer may infer that the person committed fraud or misrepresentation at the time of the visa application or upon seeking entry.

“Say one thing and shortly after do another”

The 30/60-day rule

Misrepresentation by changed activities

When the stated purpose for which a person applies for a non-immigrant US visa or seeks admission at a port of entry is different from his activities within a given time an immigration officer may infer that the person committed fraud or misrepresentation at the time of the visa application or upon seeking entry.

The violation of status within certain periods of time after issuance of the nonimmigrant visa or admission to the US may indicate fraud or misrepresentation.

The special rule under which an immigration officer may infer misrepresentation or fraud in such a case is known as the 30/60 day rule. It is important to note that even though an officer may infer misrepresentation, legal proof of misrepresentation needs more than just a mere inference. It requires that the misrepresentation is proved by both direct and circumstantial evidence.

A person who commits a misrepresentation is inadmissible and may be denied admission (including adjustment of status) under INA 212 (a)(6)(C)(i).

What changed activities?

An immigration officer applies the 30/60 day rule and invoke inadmissibility under INA 212 (a)(6)(C)(i) when for example a B2 non-immigrant states on a visa application/interview or upon entry that his purpose is tourism or to visit relatives and violate his status by:

(1) Actively seeking unauthorized employment and, after, becomes engaged in such employment;

(2) Enrolling in a program of academic study without the benefit of the proper change of status;

(3) Marrying and taking up permanent residence; or

(4) Undertaking any other activity for which a change of status or an adjustment of status would be required, without the benefit of such a change or adjustment.

The 30/60-day rule

0-30 days – Presumption of misrepresentation – if the foreign national violate his Non-Immigrant Visa status within 30 days, the offer may presume a misrepresentation in seeking a visa or entry.

30-60 days – No presumption but the officer must look at the facts for reasonable believe of a misrepresentation. The foreign nation may present evidence to refute misrepresentation.

More than 60 days – If the violation occurs after 60 days the conduct is not a basis to invoke INA 212 (a)(6)(C)(i).

Conclusion

The 30/60- day rule is just one more reason to seek legal advice from an immigration law attorney before taking any action that could have immigration consequences.

If you have any questions please speak to a qualified immigration attorney. Feel free to email me at info@goodinlaw.net. I also urge you to subscribe to this blog or the RSS feed so you can see when new articles are posted.

 

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Removing conditions on permanent residence when the U.S. petitioner dies

For those who receive a green card through a marriage that is less than two years old on the date the green card is received, Section 216 (d) (2) of the Immigration and Nationality Act provides that a conditional permanent resident must file a joint petition to remove conditions on residence I-751 within 90-day period before the second anniversary of receipt of conditional resident status – count back 90 days from the second anniversary of the Permanent Resident Card. Waiting until the last few days to send the I-751 petition with supporting evidence is a bad idea. It should get to the USCIS before the conditional green card expires. It is always a good idea to have proof of delivery.

One of the most common questions asked by those who get a green card by a marriage that is less than two years old is, “how and when do I remove the conditions on my green card?” Sometimes the U.S. spouse may be unwilling to file a joint petition and there may be issues of domestic abuse. In a few cases however the U.S. spouse may have died after the beneficiary spouse obtained conditional permanent residence but before the two year anniversary of obtaining conditional permanent residence[1]

For those who receive a green card through a marriage that is less than two years old on the date the green card is received, Section 216 (d) (2) of the Immigration and Nationality Act provides that a conditional permanent resident must file a joint petition to remove conditions on residence I-751 within 90-day period before the second anniversary of receipt of conditional resident status – count back 90 days from the second anniversary of the Permanent Resident Card. Waiting until the last few days to send the I-751 petition with supporting evidence is a bad idea. It should get to the USCIS before the conditional green card expires. It is always a good idea to have proof of delivery.

A son or daughter of the foreign spouse who achieves conditional residence within 90 days of the principal beneficiary (the foreign spouse) may be included on the same I-751 form even though such a combined petition attracts a separate biometric fee for each son or daughter regardless of age. Otherwise the son or daughter must file a separate petition.

The permanent resident status of a conditional permanent resident who fails to file the I-751 on time, will end, unless the person can show good cause that excuses a late filing. Such a person will also begin to accumulate unlawful presence which can lead to 3 or 10 year bars from the United States, if they leave.

Section 216 (c)(1) further has two requirements for removal of the condition – a jointly filed petition and an in person I-751 interview. The service can waive an I-751 interview if it is satisfied of the bona fides of the marriage based on the petition and supporting evidence. But the USCIS sometimes conducts random interviews of joint petitioners or waiver requesters.The service is more likely to waive a joint interview if the case is well-documented but may still need an interview if verification of the information through its fraud unit turns up derogatory information.

For a person who cannot file jointly because of reasons other than death of the petitioning spouse (e.g. I-751 divorce), Section 216 (c) (4) of the immigration and Nationality Act provide for hardship waivers of the joint filing and interview requirements under certain conditions. For such hardship waivers the CPR must submit a letter with the I-751 petition.

But when the petitioning spouse dies during the 2-year conditional period the law does not require a joint petition and interview and no separate I-751 waiver is required other than that requested on form I-751. Therefore the conditional resident petitioner should select (c) in Part 2 of the I-751 form and provide documentary evidence of the death as supporting evidence. The death of the petitioning spouse does not, however relieve the I-751 petitioner from the burden to prove that the marriage which ended in death was in good faith and was not entered into solely for evading the immigration laws.

A conditional permanent resident under section 216(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, who is seeking to remove the conditional basis of that status and who has timely filed the petition and appeared for the interview required under section 216(c)(1), does not need a separate section 216(c)(4) hardship waiver if the petitioning spouse died during the 2-year conditional period.

Approval

If satisfied that the marriage was not for the purpose of evading the immigration laws, USCIS may approve the petition without an interview. If the USCIS approves the petition it will remove the condition on permanent residence as of the second anniversary of receipt of conditional permanent resident status and issue a new Permanent Resident card through the mail.

RFEs, or requests for more evidence

Where the initial filing is deficient the USCIS may issue a request for more information or evidence or RFE. Failure to respond would lead to a denial due to abandonment.

If the RFE is not properly responded to the USCIS may schedule an interview. If the conditional resident alien fails to appear for an interview about the petition the alien’s permanent residence status will be automatically terminated as of the second anniversary of the date on which the alien obtained permanent residence[2].

Denial

If USCIS intends to deny the petition it will provide a Notice of Intent to Deny stating any reasons for so intending. The petitioner may then send rebuttal evidence which USCIS must consider. If the petition is ultimately denied the alien’s permanent resident status will end as of the date of the written denial.

Review of denial

A person whose i-751 petition was denied can

1. request the USCIS to certify the case to the Administrative Appeals Unit[3]

2. file a motion to reopen the case based on new facts, or a motion to reconsider the case citing valid reasons[4], or

3. seek review of the decision in removal proceedings. In such proceedings ICE must prove by a preponderance of the evidence that the petition was properly terminated [5]. But the petitioner bears the burden of proving eligibility for the petition or waiver of the joint filing requirement. He or she must be prepared to submit evidence of a good faith marriage and the death of the U.S. spouse.

[1] This situation is different from a case where a foreign national obtained permanent residence based on being the widow(er) of a US citizen. In such a case, the widow(er) spouse should not file I-751.

[2] 8 C.F.R. 216.4

[3] 8 C.F.R. 103.4 (a) 4,5

[4] 8 C.F.R. 103.5

[5] 8 C.F.R. 216.3, 1216.3

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An explanation of K1 Fiancé Visa Adjustment of Status and Divorce

A person in K1 status can only adjust based on marriage to the US citizen petitioner, not another marriage

Sometimes a k1 fiancé visa marriage like any other marriage does not always go as plan despite even the best intention. Sometimes there is a breakdown in the marriage, a k1 visa divorce and the foreign national has questions for an immigration lawyer about his/her eligibility for adjustment of status and a green card.

A k1 visa holder can only adjust status on the basis of a marriage to the US citizen petitioner within 90 days of admission to the United States. The Immigration and Marriage Fraud Amendment of 1986, explicitly prohibits a person in K1 status from adjusting on the basis of marriage to someone else.

What the K1 must show if there is a divorce

If the marriage occurred within 90 days, a person in K1 status (and her dependent children admitted in K2 status) can still adjust status to that of an alien lawfully admitted to permanent residence even if the marriage ends in divorce. Matter of Alfred Sesay, 25 I&N Dec. 431 (BIA 2011) & Matter of Le, 25 I&N Dec. 541 (BIA 2011).

A person in K1 status can only adjust based on marriage to the US citizen petitioner, not another marriage

Sometimes a k1 fiancé visa marriage like any other marriage does not always go as plan despite even the best intention. Sometimes there is a breakdown in the marriage, a k1 visa divorce and the foreign national has questions for an immigration lawyer about his/her eligibility for adjustment of status and a green card.

A k1 visa holder can only adjust status on the basis of a marriage to the US citizen petitioner within 90 days of admission to the United States. The Immigration and Marriage Fraud Amendment of 1986, explicitly prohibits a person in K1 status from adjusting on the basis of marriage to someone else.

What the K1 must show if there is a divorce

If the marriage occurred within 90 days, a person in K1 status (and her dependent children admitted in K2 status) can still adjust status to that of an alien lawfully admitted to permanent residence even if the marriage ends in divorce. Matter of Alfred Sesay, 25 I&N Dec. 431 (BIA 2011) & Matter of Le, 25 I&N Dec. 541 (BIA 2011).

The applicant must prove that

  1. the marriage occurred within 90 days of admission and that
  2. The marriage was in good faith when it occurred (affidavits of family and friends, joint assets etc.).

Because adjustment of status is an extraordinary relief, it is granted or denied based upon the equities and adverse factors present in each person’s case. Furthermore the relationship in a K1 visa case is subject to more scrutiny than for marriage immigration cases. Factors surrounding the divorce such as the length of the marriage, conduct after the marriage, whether the couple lived together, the reason for the divorce and a failure to support minor children may be considered in determining whether the marriage was in good faith. But if the marriage is real at the start, it is valid for adjustment of status.

A person in K1 status adjusts status to that of lawful permanent resident on the basis of the earlier approved I-129F petition. The divorce does not revoke this type of petition and the K1 is eligible for adjustment upon admission but conditioned on the marriage to the US citizen. The person on K1 status must still not be otherwise inadmissible. The affidavit of support requirement is met by an approved I-134.

Removing conditions on Permanent Residence

If the K1 was granted adjustment of status based upon a marriage to a US citizen that is less two years old when the adjustment is decided, the person will be granted conditional permanent resident status. If the K1 is no longer married, he or she does not have to wait until within 90 days of the second anniversary of the grant of conditional permanent residence to apply to Remove Conditions on Permanent Residence Based on Marriage; he or she can do so any time after the divorce, i.e. he or she can apply early. He or she must however request a termination of marriage waiver of the joint filing and interview requirement remove conditions on permanent residence based on marriage.

To qualify for a termination of marriage waiver, the conditional resident must prove that

  1. he or she entered into the marriage “in good faith,”
  2. the marriage was legally terminated, and
  3. The conditional resident was “not at fault” in failing to meet the joint-petition requirement.

Conclusion

A K1 (and those admitted on K2) should seek the counsel of an immigration attorney before filling for adjustment of status after the end or breakdown of the marriage that is the basis of K1 status (or K2 status).

A K1 visa holder who got married to a US citizen within 90 days and who is concerned about their status should first realize that there are provisions in the law by which he or she can still adjust status. But he or she should consult an immigration attorney as soon as possible. Sharing your day-to-day experiences with family and trusted friends may also be helpful when you need witnesses to prove that even though the marriage ended it was real.

If you want to know how to get a fiancé visa or have issues with a fiance visa for the United States commonly called the k 1 fiance visa please give my law firm a call at 1-888-747-1108 or contact us through the Contact Us form

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